Arlene Kramer - Uranian Astrologer
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Advanced Astrology


Advanced Astrology (cont.)

The Lunation Cycle
   Part One
   Part Two

Part of Fortune
   Part One
   Part Two

Part of Fortune in the Signs

Part of Fortune and Planets

Part of Fortune Surprises

Retrograde Planets
   Part One
   Part Two
   Part Three
   - Transiting Retrograde Planets A

   Part Four
   - Transiting Retrograde Planets B

   Part Five
   - Surprises About Retrograde
     Planets

   Part Six
   - More Surprises About Retrograde
     Planets


Libra Ingress 1997

The Void of Course Moon
   Part One
   Part Two
   Part Three

Advanced Techniques
   Part One
   Part Two
   Part Three

Planetary Hours
   Part One
   Part Two
   Part Three
   Part Four

Capricorn Ingress, 1997

New Year's Resolutions

Lunations 1998

Using New and Full Moons

Eclipses

Reading the Chart
   Part One: Chart-As-A-Whole
   Part Two: Chart-As-A-Whole
   Part Three: Examples
   Part Four: Examples (cont.)

Total Solar Eclipse

Astrologers' Dilemma
   - Clinton's Birth Data


Lunar Eclipse

Aries Ingress 1988

Decanates
   Part One
   Part Two
   Part Three
   Part Four
   Part Five

Eclipses

If you have been a diligent follower of this series, your calendar or appointment book for 1998 includes the dates of 12 New Moons and 12 Full Moons. Among these dates are five eclipses: three Lunar and two Solar. This week, we shall take a basic look at understanding an eclipse.

Last week I described how one should study the New Moons and Full Moons to see if a particular horoscope will be affected. In particular, we should look first to see if the New Moon or Full Moon is conjunct or opposite a planet or personal point in the horoscope of interest. I personally do not use more than 1 degree of orb. Other people use wider orbs.

Next, we should look to see what house or houses are affected in the horoscope of interest. Up to this point, the procedures for studying a New Moon or Full Moon and an eclipse are the same. After all, a Solar Eclipse is a special New Moon, and a Lunar Eclipse is a special Full Moon. They require special alignments of the Sun, the Moon, the Earth, the Moon's Nodes, and the declinations.

The significant difference between the interpretation of an eclipse or of a lunation is in the duration and intensity of the eclipse's effect. While the New Moon has an effect from the day of the New Moon until the next New Moon, and the Full Moon has an effect from the day of the Full Moon until the next New Moon (approximately four weeks and two weeks, respectively), the eclipse has an effect that starts months before the eclipse and lasts months afterwards.

It is said that one can feel the effects of an eclipse up to three months before it occurs. There are differing opinions about how long after an eclipse one can still feel the effects. Some say years, some say months. I personally prefer to think in terms of six to twelve months.

What is the effect of an eclipse? As with the New Moon or the Full Moon, if an eclipse is conjunct or opposite a planet in the horoscope of interest, an event will occur in the nature of that planet, and in the nature of the house it occupies, and the house the planet rules. The effect is usually powerful.

For those of you who are watching the horoscopes of family members and friends, I shall repeat the five eclipses in 1998. Watch for conjunctions and oppositions to the following points:

7 Pisces 55
22 Virgo 24
15 Aquarius 21
28 Leo 48
13 Pisces 40

For thousands of years, astrologers have known with great accuracy the timing of eclipses, including their reoccurrence in a 19?year cycle. They have used this information to guide rulers and generals. We can use the same information to determine whether or not a forthcoming eclipse will have an effect on a nation or on a national leader. For example, the forthcoming eclipse on February 26, 1998, shows no significant effect on Washington, D.C. but it has a potential for a problem along the longitude of Denver, Colorado (about 105 degrees West) where Uranus is on the Midheaven of the eclipse chart, and also along the longitude of about 78 degrees 21 minutes, where the Sun?Moon eclipse is on the Midheaven. Cities at that longitude include Batavia, New York; Altoona, Pennsylvania; and Raleigh, North Carolina.

The eclipse is just one more tool available to the astrologer. Many times it will not apply to the horoscope of interest in the time frame of interest. When the eclipse is pertinent, its effect is powerful.

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